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Conjugation of verb (past tense)

A1

carve

Infinitive

carve

/kɑɹv/

Past simple

carved

/kɑɹvd/

Past participle

carved; carven

/kɑɹv/




   
   

Conjugation of the irregular verb [carve]

Conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (alteration of form according to rules of grammar). For instance, the verb "break" can be conjugated to form the words break, breaks, broke, broken and breaking.

The term conjugation is applied only to the inflection of verbs, and not of other parts of speech (inflection of nouns and adjectives is known as declension). Also it is often restricted to denoting the formation of finite forms of a verb – these may be referred to as conjugated forms, as opposed to non-finite forms, such as the infinitive or gerund, which tend not to be marked for most of the grammatical categories.

Conjugation is also the traditional name for a group of verbs that share a similar conjugation pattern in a particular language (a verb class). A verb that does not follow all of the standard conjugation patterns of the language is said to be an {###} {####} irregular verb.

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Present

I
carve 
you
carve 
he/she/it
carves 
we
carve 
you
carve 
they
carve 

Present Continuous

I
am carving 
you
are carving 
he/she/it
is carving 
we
are carving 
you
are carving 
they
are carving 

Past simple

I
carved 
you
carved 
he/she/it
carved 
we
carved 
you
carved 
they
carved 

Past Continuous

I
was carving 
you
were carving 
he/she/it
was carving 
we
were carving 
you
were carving 
they
were carving 

Present perfect

I
have carved 
you
have carved 
he/she/it
has carved 
we
have carved 
you
have carved 
they
have carved 

Present perfect continuous

I
have been carving 
you
have been carving 
he/she/it
has been carving 
we
have been carving 
you
have been carving 
they
have been carving 

Past perfect

I
had carved 
you
had carved 
he/she/it
had carved 
we
had carved 
you
had carved 
they
had carved 

Past perfect continuous

I
had been carving 
you
had been carving 
he/she/it
had been carving 
we
had been carving 
you
had been carving 
they
had been carving 

Future

I
will carve 
you
will carve 
he/she/it
will carve 
we
will carve 
you
will carve 
they
will carve 

Future continuous

I
will be carving 
you
will be carving 
he/she/it
will be carving 
we
will be carving 
you
will be carving 
they
will be carving 

Future perfect

I
will have carved 
you
will have carved 
he/she/it
will have carved 
we
will have carved 
you
will have carved 
they
will have carved 

Future perfect continuous

I
will have been carving 
you
will have been carving 
he/she/it
will have been carving 
we
will have been carving 
you
will have been carving 
they
will have been carving 

Conditional of the irregular verb [carve]

Causality (also referred to as causation or cause and effect) is influence by which one event, process, state or object (a cause) contributes to the production of another event, process, state or object (an effect) where the cause is partly responsible for the effect, and the effect is partly dependent on the cause. In general, a process has many causes, which are also said to be causal factors for it, and all lie in its past. An effect can in turn be a cause of, or causal factor for, many other effects, which all lie in its future.

The conditional mood (abbreviated cond) is a grammatical mood used in conditional sentences to express a proposition whose validity is dependent on some condition, possibly counterfactual.

English does not have an inflective (morphological) conditional mood, except in as much as the modal verbs could, might, should and would may in some contexts be regarded as conditional forms of can, may, shall and will respectively. What is called the English conditional mood (or just the conditional) is formed periphrastically using the modal verb would in combination with the bare infinitive of the following verb. (Occasionally should is used in place of would with a first person subject – see shall and will. Also the aforementioned modal verbs could, might and should may replace would in order to express appropriate modality in addition to conditionality.)

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Conditional present

I
would carve 
you
would carve 
he/she/it
would carve 
we
would carve 
you
would carve 
they
would carve 

Conditional present progressive

I
would be carving 
you
would be carving 
he/she/it
would be carving 
we
would be carving 
you
would be carving 
they
would be carving 

Conditional perfect

I
would have carved 
you
would have carved 
he/she/it
would have carved 
we
would have carved 
you
would have carved 
they
would have carved 

Conditional perfect progressive

I
would have been carving 
you
would have been carving 
he/she/it
would have been carving 
we
would have been carving 
you
would have been carving 
they
would have been carving 

Subjunktiv of the irregular verb [carve]

The subjunctive is a grammatical mood, a feature of the utterance that indicates the speaker's attitude toward it. Subjunctive forms of verbs are typically used to express various states of unreality such as: wish, emotion, possibility, judgement, opinion, obligation, or action that has not yet occurred; the precise situations in which they are used vary from language to language. The subjunctive is one of the irrealis moods, which refer to what is not necessarily real. It is often contrasted with the indicative, a realis mood which is used principally to indicate that something is a statement of fact.

Subjunctives occur most often, although not exclusively, in subordinate clauses, particularly that-clauses. Examples of the subjunctive in English are found in the sentences "I suggest that you be careful" and "It is important that she stay by your side."

The subjunctive mood in English is a clause type used in some contexts which describe non-actual possibilities, e.g. "It's crucial that you be here" and "It's crucial that he arrive early." In English, the subjunctive is syntactic rather than inflectional, since there is no specifically subjunctive verb form. Rather, subjunctive clauses recruit the bare form of the verb which is also used in a variety of other constructions.

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Present subjunctive

I
carve 
you
carve 
he/she/it
carve 
we
carve 
you
carve 
they
carve 

Past subjunctive

I
carved 
you
carved 
he/she/it
carved 
we
carved 
you
carved 
they
carved 

Past perfect subjunctive

I
had carved 
you
had carved 
he/she/it
had carved 
we
had carved 
you
had carved 
they
had carved 

Imperativ of the irregular verb [carve]

The imperative mood is a grammatical mood that forms a command or request.

An example of a verb used in the imperative mood is the English phrase "Go." Such imperatives imply a second-person subject (you), but some other languages also have first- and third-person imperatives, with the meaning of "let's (do something)" or "let them (do something)" (the forms may alternatively be called cohortative and jussive).

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Imperativ

I
carve 
you
Let´s carve 
he/she/it
carve 
we
 
you
 
they
 

Participle of the irregular verb [carve]

In linguistics, a participle (ptcp) is a form of nonfinite verb that comprises perfective or continuative grammatical aspects in numerous tenses. A participle also may function as an adjective or an adverb. For example, in "boiled potato", boiled is the past participle of the verb boil, adjectivally modifying the noun potato; in "ran us ragged," ragged is the past participle of the verb rag, adverbially qualifying the verb ran.

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Present participle

I
carving 
you
 
he/she/it
 
we
 
you
 
they
 

Past participle

I
carved; carven 
you
 
he/she/it
 
we
 
you
 
they
 

Phrasal verbs of the irregular verb [carve]

Carve out

Carve up













regular verbs & Irregular verbs